Some stuff on AT training

lactate meters. Plus, even with lactate meters athletes struggle with getting it right.

One of the main reasons for this (even if you have a lactate meter) is that when you go to a lab to take a “lactate profile test” your system is probably already working very early on the anaerobic system and the values you will get for the AT, will normally be anywhere from 3.5-5 mmol/l (the Germans use 4.0 almost exclusively for their athletes)

Problem is, at least from the experience I have made with it, that if you continue to train at this lactate intensity given to you in the lab you will continue to be stuck using the very low end aneerobic system instead of switching to using the aerobic on a higher end. So the point is, in order to get where you want to be you need to first dp training much lower than your measured lab AT, THEN the AT lactate on the next tests will adjust down to where you will continue to be over the next years.

You can see this clearly on my own tests also. The first test I did, as a 14 year old, my AT was well over 4.5 (and Vo2 max 63) Then it stayed right around 4.0 for six years all the way until I started adjusting everything down to where it “would be in three months”. On the next test I was over 1.0 mmol (Vo2 87) lower and have stayed there ever since.

For most, this pace will be around (in the wintertime, outside of the track) about 10 km pace plus 10 %. So that is a good way to start building it if access to lactate testing is limited..

Training is going well. I will be right where I want to be 01.Jan when I really start picking it up (or actually around the 10th this year, as I have exams to take care of first) The shape is not racing but good enough to deal with the hard training of January and onwards. I cannot wait!!! It is about time soon and I get more and more ready as time passes ๐Ÿ™‚

Treadmill today. Henrik tried to get convince me to run at Frognerkilen but I feel for some indoor training.

Good training ๐Ÿ™‚
Marius